28 Comments
Sep 8, 2023Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

I found something on PubMed (NIH.Gov) this morning that may be of interest to you. If TPTB are putting out information like this, which is exceptionally misleading, there may be a difficulty in getting iodine independent of the medical professional community in our future.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495864/

Look Out for Lugol's Matthew Grissinger, RPh, FASCP

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Correct dosing is really important with a concentrated liquid solution. Physicians and nurses aren't familiar with Lugol's iodine drops as they were in the early years of health care.

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Sep 8, 2023Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

I would agree with that. I support medical professionals, even 2 with PhDs. Several more as ancillary support. I'm finding a lot of "common knowledge" has been lost over the past 80 years.

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Hey Jennifer, what do you think of this product? I became familiar with Linsey McLean when I used her horse feed formulation, which has a high level of iodine... I use this New Iodine for myself. https://newiodine.com/index.html

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It looks good. Chelated is better absorbed. I wouldn't stay on 50 mg more than a month or two though (4 caps, 2 am and pm). That is a detox amount to help remove fluoride and bromide. 12.5 mg per day should be enough for healthy maintenance I think. I did go hyperthyroid and it is unpleasant.

And take selenium too.

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Thanks for this info.

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Very welcome!

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Oct 2, 2022Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

Can you please be more specific about "many decades ago the standard treatment of thyroid conditions with iodine was switched to medications that use a more dangerous type of iodine." What is the dangerous types of iodine? What are the good ones? Thank you.

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Radioactive iodine type of "treatments" - kill the hyperthyroid or thyroid cancer instead of correcting function vs standard non-radioactive iodine/iodide, Lugol's drops, or Iodoral are same names. I believe. I was summarizing from whatever the link was in part - what it was mentioning included radioactive iodine. I am not sure if there are other bad formulations of iodine.

Around the same time, the 1950s, potassium bromide was added as an anti-caking agent to bread and pastry flour instead of the previous standard, potassium iodide.

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Sep 14, 2023Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

I went through nursing school about five years ago, and, in the textbook discussion of thyroid disease, radioactive iodine tx vs iodine supplementation was conflated.

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just a minor error...

was it pointed out to the class or did you notice the error in your own reading?

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Sep 16, 2023Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

I noticed on my own! Never discussed in class, of course.

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Criminal times have been with us for a long time, apparently. Mind blowing as more gets revealed.

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Sep 17, 2023Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

We also had an assignment evaluating a drug research meta-study. (The authors did data analysis of multiple studies), I pointed out while the authors recommended the drug be used because hospital stays were reduced, the overall mortality rates in the tx group increased! The nursing instructor was not impressed and reprimanded me for second-guessing the study's recommendations.

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Sep 26, 2022Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

Another informative post! I have already added iodine in my list of supplements since i came to know about the benefits from your website...however the brand available here(the dependable one ,as potassium iodide) has only 140mcg, which i think is much lower to have any benefit, will try to get a higher dosage one ! Many Thanks for guiding us ..

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Sep 26, 2022·edited Sep 26, 2022Author

Very welcome and 140 mcg would be very close to the US recommendation which is quite low. Yes, it is a huge difference. The Wolff-Chaikoff "error" is a huge error.

Kelp supplements tend to be around 400 mg of iodine as a standardized supplement . Each batch of seaweed has to be tested because it varies.

The much higher loading dose for one month is to help clear out bromide and fluoride and chloride which is part of the problem.

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Sep 27, 2022Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

I get that, thank you! For some reason I did not get notification of ypur reply ! Manually visited the post again and saw reply ...

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Yes, notifications are a problem. Your Substack inbox is another way to look for activity.

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Could you comment on chloride? I always assumed NaCl/KCl as the active electrolytes in the cellular physiology of action potentials, Na-K ATPase enzymes, etc.

It should be difficult to clear out chloride, I can see that fluoride and bromide might be substantially reduced.

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Dr Brownstein’s work measured urine content and I think saw all three be excreted in greater amounts when high dose iodine was used as a preloading phase. One month is his protocol at 50 mg a day, 2 Iodoral in the am and pm. And selenium. Then go to one Iodoral a day for maintenance and selenium.

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Sep 26, 2022Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

Do you recommend supplementation with potassium iodide? And how much do you advise people? Some practitioners are cautious and others seem to recommend very high dosages

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I forgot to link to it in my article but I think the iodine and pregnancy does, see my webpage on effectivecare.info - G9. Iodine and Thyroid for more details about the high dose protocol or just food sources of iodine and selenium. Both are needed and depending on individual issues, I do think the high dose supplements are safe and probably needed by many to most people in the US. Iodoral is a 12.5 mg tablet that could be cut in half, it has a score line. Otherwise, a reputable company for kelp supplement might be a more moderate start. The Japanese on average get 13 mg per day if eating the traditional seaweed seasoned diet. https://effectivecare.info/g9-iodine-%26-thyroid

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Jan 5·edited Jan 5Liked by Jennifer Depew, R.D.

Hi Jennifer, I have eyebrow hair loss, hot flashes too and want to start an iodine supplement. What is a good daily dosage? 600mcg? Mercola has a 1500mcg also... thank you!

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Selenium, 200 mcg per day and iodine level you are comfortable trying, minimally I would recommend a 400 mg seaweed type of iodine supplement or 600 would help. 1500 is on the high end. 1200 mcg was what I used - Iodoral tablets include iodine and iodide forms and have a score line to break them in half in case you want to use 600. Dr. Brownstein recommends a one month loading dose period with 2 Iodorals in the morning and two in the evening in order to flood the body with iodine which gives it the opportunity to kick out bromide, fluoride or chloride that is taking up a spot that iodine should fill. It really worked for me, helped end fibrocystic breast pain. But then I continued the 1200 mcg Iodoral once a day for years without selenium and I went hyperthyroid. Autoimmune gluten issues were part of my problem and I got better pretty quickly on a gluten free diet with no cheating and avoiding iodine.

If you are working with a doctor, lab tests for iodine sufficiency is typically a 24 hour urine collection but there is a simpler, rough test, where you paint a one inch square or 2 inch square of skin with betaiodine and see how quickly the body absorbs it see how quikly the color goes away - roughly. I need to find a link for that.

This link is a 404 page now, but "TESTING FOR IODINE SUFFICIENCY An easy test for iodine sufficiency is the patch test. Swab a 2 inch square of iodine on the soft skin of the inner upper arm and check for its absorption rate. In a body fully iodine satisfied it should take 18 to 24 hours for the iodine to be absorbed." I don't understand the Wayback Machine - I don't care that the page was crawled 10 times, I just want to see the page -?- https://web.archive.org/web/20230501000000*/https://www.vitality757.com/iodine-sufficiency.html

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Thank you so much, Jennifer! Do you recommend nascent iodine? I'll look for a home skin test kit. I really appreciate your help 😀

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The blue iodine recipe in my Protocol Collation sounds interesting, supposed to be safer and more effective

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I am not sure what nascent iodine is.

The home skin test would be purchasing a bottle of Betadine - it is the yellow stuff that is used topically on the skin before cutting a surgical opening. It is a strong antiseptic or antibiotic (jargon?). Occasionally people have gone hyperthyroid from too much Betadine use, like a long-term Gtube might be cleaned around daily, but Betadine on the skin around it daily for months could add up eventually to excess iodine.

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